Saturday, 12 December 2015

HAPPY HOLIDAYS!!!

It was really nice to have you all in class this year!!! 

I wish you Merry Christmas and a great New 2016!!!!!

Tons of luck !!!! Loves, Miss Claudia


Friday, 6 November 2015

Unit 10 Might



"Might" is most commonly used to express possibility. It is also often used in conditional sentences. English speakers can also use "might" to make suggestions or requests, although this is less common in American English.
Examples:
  • Your purse might be in the living room. possibility
  • If I didn't have to work, I might go with you. conditional
  • You might visit the botanical gardens during your visit. suggestion
  • Might I borrow your pen? request

Using "Might" in Present, Past, and Future

Most modal verbs behave quite irregularly in the past and the future. Study the chart below to learn how "might" behaves in different contexts.
Modal UsePositive Forms
1. = Present   2. = Past   3. = Future
Negative Forms
1. = Present   2. = Past   3. = Future
Also use:
might
possibility
1. She might be on the bus. I think her car is having problems.2. She might have taken the bus. I'm not sure how she got to work.
3. She might take the bus to get home. I don't think Bill will be able to give her a ride.
1. She might not be on the bus. She might be walking home.2. She might not have taken the bus. She might have walked home.
3. She might not take the bus. She might get a ride from Bill.
could,
may
might
conditional of may
1. If I entered the contest, I might actually win.2. If I had entered the contest, I might actually have won.
3. If I entered the contest tomorrow, I might actually win. Unfortunately, I can't enter it.
1. Even if I entered the contest, I might not win.2. Even if I had entered the contest, I might not have won.
3. Even if I entered the contest tomorrow, I might not win.
might
suggestion
1. NO PRESENT FORM2. You might have tried the cheese cake.
3. You might try the cheesecake.
1. NO PRESENT FORM2. PAST FORM UNCOMMON
3. You might not want to eat the cheese cake. It's very calorific.
could
might
request(British form)
Might I have something to drink?Might I borrow the stapler?
Requests usually refer to the near future.
 NEGATIVE FORMS UNCOMMONcould,
may,
can
REMEMBER: "Might not" vs. "Could not" 
"Might not" suggests you do not know if something happens. "Could not" suggests that it is impossible for something to happen.
Examples:
  • Jack might not have the key. Maybe he does not have the key.
  • Jack could not have the key. It is impossible that he has the key.

EXERCISES AND RELATED TOPICS


Used to

FORM

[used to + VERB]
Example:
  • used to go to the beach every day.
It is better not to use "used to" in questions or negative forms; however, this is sometimes done in informal spoken English. It is better to ask questions and create negative sentences using Simple Past.

USE 1 Habit in the Past

"Used to" expresses the idea that something was an old habit that stopped in the past. It indicates that something was often repeated in the past, but it is not usually done now.
Examples:
  • Jerry used to study English.
  • Sam and Mary used to go to Mexico in the summer.
  • used to start work at 9 o'clock.
  • Christine used to eat meat, but now she is a vegetarian.

USE 2 Past Facts and Generalizations

"Used to" can also be used to talk about past facts or generalizations which are no longer true.
Examples:
  • used to live in Paris.
  • Sarah used to be fat, but now she is thin.
  • George used to be the best student in class, but now Lena is the best.
  • Oranges used to cost very little in Florida, but now they are quite expensive.

"Used to" vs. Simple Past

Both Simple Past and "Used to" can be used to describe past habits, past facts and past generalizations; however, "used to" is preferred when emphasizing these forms of past repetition in positive sentences. On the other hand, when asking questions or making negative sentences,Simple Past is preferred.
Examples:
  • You used to play the piano.
  • Did you play the piano when you were young?
  • You did not play the piano when you were young.

ACTIVE / PASSIVE

Examples:
  • Jerry used to pay the bills. Active
  • The bills used to be paid by Jerry. Passive




Tuesday, 20 October 2015

First and Second conditional practice

CLICK HERE TO PRACTICE


Unit 9 Second Conditional

Let's have a look at these examples given:

Now, practice it HERE


Reader: Murders in the Rue Morgue

Let's revise some facts and details about this lovely story

CLICK HERE


Now let's do some activities:
1.-Are these sentences true (T) or false (F)?
1.  Auguste Dupin was a police detective.
2.  Auguste Dupin and his friend lived in the Rue Morgue.
3.  Auguste Dupin and his friend went for walks every afternoon.
4.  Chantilly wrote a very bad book.
5.  The body of the daughter was in the chimney.
6.  Some people heard an argument in the dead women’s house.

7.  All of the witnesses spoke French.
8.  The police arrested a bank clerk.
9.  The murderer came to France on a ship.
10.   The murderer went to prison.
               
2.-Put the following events in the right order. Number them 1-10.
1.     The neighbours and the police find the bodies.
2.     Dupin explains about the voices and the window.
3.     The sailor sells the orangoutang.
4.     The sailor finds the orangoutang again.
5.     People hear screams in the house.
6.     Dupin shows his friend a book about orangoutangs.
7.     Dupin reads about the murders in the newswpaper.
8.     The sailor tells his story.
9.     The sailor comes to see Dupin.
10.    Dupin and his friend go to the house.
               
3-Who said this? Who did they say it to?
The doctorDupinDupin’s friendthe policethe sailor.
1.  ‘He cannot write tragedy, that is true.’ ……………….. to ………………..
2.  ‘I don’t know any apple-sellers!’ ……………….. to ………………..
3.  ‘All this was done by a very strong person.’ ……………….. to ………………..
4.  ‘The animal ran, and I followed.’ ……………….. to ………………..
5.  ‘I found the answer to this mystery, and he didn’t.’ ………… to …..

4.-Who, in the story . . .
Le BonDupinDupin’s friendMadame L’EspanayeMademoiselle L’Espanayethe sailor.
1.  . . . met Dupin in a bookshop? ………………..
2.  . . . came from a famous family? ………………..
3.  . . . lived with her mother? ………………..
4.  . . . once helped Dupin? ………………..
5.  . . . had some hair in her hand? ………………..
6.  . . . put an advertisement in the newspaper? ………………..
7.  . . . carried a heavy stick? ………………..
8.  . . . followed an orang-outang through the streets of Paris? ………..
9.  . . . told the police the true story? ………………..
10.  . . . was free at the end of the story? ………………..
               
5.-  Fill in the gaps. Use these words:
chimneyhandslightning-rodorang-outangrazorshutterstreetssailorthrewwindow.
The …………………… escaped and ran through the ……………………of Paris. He got into the house by climbing up the ……………………, and then swung on the ……………………through the open …………………… . He killed the older woman with a ……………………, and the younger woman with his …………………… . Then he pushed the younger woman up the …………………… and ……………………her mother out of the window. The ……………………watched the murders but he couldn’t stop them.
               

6.-Here are some more newspaper stories from the Gazette. Use the words below to complete the stories.
agile 
dropped
horrible
out of
thousand
arrested
escaped
how
outside
through
 bank  
feet
hurt
same
up
belongs
free
into
sell
which
 caught 
hands
motive
shutter
who
STORY ONE
Adolphe Le Bon, ……………… works for Mignaud and Son as a ……………….. clerk, today left prison, a ……………….. man. The police ……………… him because they thought that the …………….. for the murders was the four ……………….francs in gold,  …………….. Le Bon carried to the house for Madame L’Espanaye. “But it was all a  ………………… mistake”, said a friend of Le Bon’s. “Adolphe couldn’t ………….. a fly”

STORY TWO
The police now know …………. The murderer got ………………… and ……………….. the room in the house in the Rue Morgue. He climbed ………. the lighting-rod on the wall …………….., and took hold of the open …………….. with both ………………. then he pushed his …………….. against the wall and swung himself into the room ……………. the open window. He went out the ……………….. way, and the window ……………….. down behind him.

STORY THREE
Early this morning an orangoutang was …… in the Bois de Boulogne. The animal, which comes from Borneo, …… to a sailor and …. From this house four days ago. It is a large animal, and is strong, ……, and very dangerous. The sailor is planning to ………… it as soon as he can.

Thursday, 1 October 2015

First Conditional Practice

This segment is about a woman who killed her violent husband and is now in house arrest. The segment shows police officers telling her about how her ankle bracelet works and its misuse consequences. 


Conditions:

1 - She passes the 100 perimeter space.
2 - The alarm continues for more than 3 minutes. 
3 - They get a blackout or something.

4 - She has any violation.
5 - She attempts to remove the electronic ankle bracelet or tamper with the base unit.
6 - She breaks the house arrest rules. 



Consequences:


( 1 ) The alarm activates.
( ) A signal is automatically sent and a car is seen immediately.
( ) She goes back to jail.
( ) It automatically adds 10 years to her sentence.
( ) An alarm automatically alerts the police.
( ) The base unit still works.

Before viewing:

Discuss the following questions with a partner:

1 - What are the advantages and disadvantages of house arrest?
2 - Do you agree with this procedure of the law? Why (not)?
3 - Is it an effective way to rehabilitate prisoners? Why (not)?

Now watch the segment and decide whether your guesses were correct.





Sunday, 30 August 2015

Infinitive with to

Additional Grammar Notes:
  • The infinitive has two forms in English:
  1. WORK is the form which is given in a dictionary. You have seen this used in present simple questions and negatives, for instance: Do you work?, I didn't work , and after the modal verb CAN.
  2. TO WORK you should already be familiar with the infinitive with to used after some verbs such as want and would like, for instance: I want to come with you.
! The infinitive of purpose is only used to express a (+) reason. To express a (-) reason we use in order not to or so as not to. For example: We took a taxi so as not to be late.

Now let's practice with these video:



Wednesday, 15 July 2015

Happy Winter Holidays!!!!




 Enjoy them because when we get back we will have a lot of    work to do!!!!!  :)

                                   Take Care!!!! Miss Claudia & Miss Belen

Thursday, 18 June 2015

Unit 4 C Something, Anything, Nothing, etc

Do you want to learn something new today? These four words are quite similar and it can be complicated to understand which one you need to use.
Something means a thing that is unknown. It is often used in positive sentences.
Anything means a thing of any kind. Use it in questions and negative sentences. It can also be used to to mean I don't mind.
Nothing means no single thing. Used as subjects of a sentence or question.
Everything means all the things. Use in affirmative, negative and interrogative sentences when we want to be inclusive.
In the following sentences, can you decide which word is needed? Read the sentence carefully and think about the context. Remember to look out for double negatives! Good luck.
  • 1. I don’t have ___ to eat.



  • 2. There’s ___ in this room making a noise. What is it?



  • 3. There’s ___ wrong with you, you’re perfectly healthy.



  • 4. Do you have ___ you need for the trip?



  • 5. If you need ___ , just call me.



  • 6. That mess has ___ to do with me!



  • 7. There’s ___ important I need to tell you, please could we talk privately



  • 8. ___ must go in our once a year sale!



  • 9. The doctors did ___ they could, but it wasn’t enough.



  • 10. There’s ___ you can say to make me forgive you. I never want to speak to you again.



  • 11. There isn’t ___ left, the burglars took it all.



  • 12. Everyone must bring ___ for lunch.



  • 13. I promise, ___ is fine! I’m just really tired.



  • 14. In my opinion, ___ is more important than family.



  • 15. Argh! ___ just crawled over my foot! 





Unit 4 B Present Perfect or Past Simple??


First : Let's watch this video !





Second:  CLICK HERE to practice



Unit 4. Speaking Game. Present Perfect



Saturday, 6 June 2015

Unit 4 . Make or do????

When 'do' or 'make' are used as main verbs it can be confusing to ESL learners. The verb 'make' goes with some words and the verb 'do' with other words.

Do

We use the verb 'do' when someone performs an action, activity or task.
do a crossword 
do the ironing 
do the laundry
do the washing
do the washing up
'Do' is often used when referring to work of any kind.
do your work 
do homework 
do houseworkdo your job
!Note - these activities do not usually produce a physical object.
'Do' for General Ideas
Use the verb 'do' when speaking about things in general. In other words, to describe an action without saying exactly what the action is. This form is often used with the words 'something, nothing, anything, everything, etc.'
I'm not doing anything today. 
He does everything for his mother. 
She's doing nothing.
Important Expressions with 'Do'
There are a number of standard expressions that take the verb 'do'. The best solution is to try to learn them.
do badly 
do business 
do the dishes 
do a favour 
do good 
do harm 
do time - (to go to prison)
do well
do your best
do your hair 
do your nails
do your worst 

Make

We use the verb 'make' for constructing, building or creating
make a dress 
make food 
make a cup of tea / coffee
'Make' is often used when referring to preparing food of any kind.
make a meal - breakfast / lunch / dinner
!Note - these activities usually create something that you can touch.
Important Expressions with 'Make'
There are a number of standard expressions that take the verb 'make'. The best solution is to try to learn them.
make amends 
make arrangements 
make believe - (to pretend)
make a choice
make a comment
make a decision
make a difference 
make an effort
make an enquiry 
make an excuse 
make a fool of yourself 
make a fortune
make friends 
make a fuss 
make a journey 
make love 
make a mess 
make a mistake 
make money 
make a move 
make a noise 
make a payment 
make a phone call
make a plan
make a point 
make a profit 
make a promise 
make a remark
make a sound
make a speech
make a suggestion
make time 
make a visit
make your bed - (to prepare the bed for sleeping in)
NOW TEST YOURSELF